Medical Volunteer Welcome Page

    Welcome to the Depot Nurse Orientation Website! 

This website is to help supplement what you will be learning on orientation day. We know there is limited time on orientation day, so this website was made for our nurse volunteers to be more readily prepared for the week of fun at camp! In no means do we expect you to know everything on this website, but please feel free to look around and learn as much as you can before you get to camp. It will definitely be helpful to you prior to your arrival at camp. Thanks and have fun exploring!

Many of our campers come to camp with an EpiPen. An EpiPen is used in the emergency treatment of an anaphylactic reaction.  The cabin leaders are responsible for carrying the campers’ EpiPens and other emergency medication to each program and activity they attend after collaboration with the cabin nurse.  We also have extra EpiPens in the Depot in the Cor Cart and Jump bag.  As nurses, we have the ability to draw up our own epinephrine and administer it that way.  Please watch the below video to learn how to use an EpiPen in case one of your campers need it.    


Another common emergency medication that our campers are to keep near them if needed is Diastat. Diastat is a rectal gel form of diazepam that is used to treat episodes of increased seizures. The order will typically say specific information of when to administer the medication (ex: after 5 minutes of seizure activity).
  

 

An ACE is an antegrade continence enema. Campers who have an ACE have a small opening on their abdomen that opens into the colon. A catheter is inserted into this opening and fluid is infused into the bowel to help produce a bowel movement. It is very similar to a regular enema except this procedure allows the camper to be more independent and have easier access to their bowels! Many of the campers are independent with this procedure, but may need some assistance. Also, once the fluid is in the bowel, the camper will most likely sit for 30 to 90 minutes until they produce a bowel movement. Below is a great video of a girl that has an ACE. She will show you how it typically works.

A Mitrofanoff is a small stoma in the abdomen created to pass a catheter through to drain urine. This procedure avoids the need to wear a urostomy pouch over the stoma. Many of our campers are independent on performing this procedure, but they often need reminders to do it. Typically, mitrofanoffs need to be drained every 4 hours and a little less often during the night.


Mitrofanoffs may need a “washout”. This procedure is done every so often to clear any debris that may be blocking urine from exiting through the catheter.                                                  

Most of us already know what a urinary catheter is and what it does, but it may have been a while since you have done the procedure! Many of our campers that use this procedure are straight cathed and then the catheter is removed. We have some campers that sleep with a catheter so they do not have to wake up to be straight cathed. Below are videos of the proper technique for inserting a urinary catheter. The procedure is the same for straight cathing except that the catheter is removed once the urine is drained.

   

Some of our campers have a colostomy or and ileostomy. This procedure is performed by pulling a piece of the bowel through an opening in the stomach to create a stoma to eliminate stool (colostomy=colon, ileostomy=ileum/small intestine). A bag is then placed over the stoma to catch the waste as it moves through the bowel. Here is a video of how to empty an ostomy bag:

                                                                                   

Our campers may be independent emptying the bags, but usually need help if they have to change the bag. Below is a video of how to change an ostomy bag. The steps/process can change depending on personal preference and different brands.

There are many different classifications of seizures. The video below will briefly explain the different types of seizures. We have seen all types of seizures at camp and some of our campers have multiple seizures a day, regularly. Treatment varies depending on the individual and their seizure disorder. Each camper with a seizure disorder will have a Seizure Action Plan from the doctor that will describe what needs to be done when they have a seizure. You will have a chance to review your camper’s Seizure Action Plans when you get to camp. You can make a copy of it and have it with you for reference.

                                                                                   Care for a person having a tonic clonic seizure
:

  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Urinary Catheterizations multiple times a day
    2. Mitrofanoff catheterizations multiple times a day
    3. ACE (Antegrade Continence Enema) procedures
    4. Other types of Bowel/Bladder Routines
    5. G Tube feedings/Care
    6. Assistance with ADL’s
    7. Perineal care: many of these campers have a lack of sensation; periodic checking for accidents is important to prevent skin breakdown/pressure ulcers.
    8. Application/Removal of orthotics (ex-AFO’s)
    9. Seizure control
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Assistance with campers that are independent with procedures (mitrofanoff, bowel/bladder routines) - Counselors cannot perform catheterizations
    2. Application/Removal of Orthotics (ex-AFO’s)
    3. Perineal Care
    4. Assistance with ADL’s
  3. Programmatic Adaptations
    1. Some may need seizure precautions-2 side walkers at equestrian and never left unattended at boating
    2. Padding to G tube sites, ACE’s, Mitrofanoffs, etc. for Challenge Course
  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Nebulizer treatments usually in AM and PM
    2. Rescue Inhalers, counselors to carry with them if needed for emergency treatment
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Monitor diet, expect multiple allergies, including food allergies and have EpiPens readily available at meal times
    2. Rescue Inhalers, counselors to carry with them if needed for emergency treatment
  3. Programmatic Adaptations
    1. Eliminate allergens, be especially careful in the barn/equestrian
  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Nebulizer treatments usually in AM and PM
    2. Rescue Inhalers, counselors to carry with them if needed for emergency treatment
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Monitor diet, expect multiple allergies, including food allergies and have EpiPens readily available at meal times
    2. Rescue Inhalers, counselors to carry with them if needed for emergency treatment
  3. Programmatic Adaptations
    1. Eliminate allergens, be especially careful in the barn/equestrian
  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Keep campers hydrated
    2. Monitor O2 saturation on Sickle Cell campers upon arrival and as needed.
    3. Campers with cancer may be immunocompromised so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
    4. Cover and protect ports/PICCS for boating and bathing.
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Keep campers out of extreme temperatures (hot/cold).  Avoid rain.
    2. Campers should stay well hydrated, increase fluids while at camp.
    3. Campers are at increased risk for sunburn-provide shade, sunblock, and hats.
    4. Campers with cancer may have decreased immune systems so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
  3. Programmatic Adaptations
    1. Some may need seizure precautions-2 side walkers at equestrian and never left unattended at boating
    2. Ports need to be covered and protected by a nurse
  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Daily blood pressures
    2. Peritoneal Dialysis campers, protect catheter.
    3. Monitor for UTI’s/sepsis, peritonitis
    4. Campers with transplants may be immunocompromised so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Fluid restrictions and/or increase fluids, individually based
    2. Diet restrictions, low sodium diets
    3. Campers with transplants may have decreased immune systems so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
       
  1. Nursing Care: 
    1. Protect transplant site, especially if transplant is < 1 year old
    2. Ostomy/Bowel Program care
    3. G-tube feedings/care
    4. Campers with transplants may be immunocompromised so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
  2. Counselor Care
    1. Assist to empty ostomies
    2. Campers may have decreased immune systems so promote good hygiene to campers, staff, and volunteers.
    3. Frequent bathroom breaks may be needed
    4. Multiple allergies/food restrictions
  3. Programmatic Adaptations
    1. Padding to transplant site for challenge course or for any other activities that may irritate those sites